Why Are My Feet Cramping?

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Experts are not really sure exactly why muscles cramp, but there is definitely a correlation between dehydration and muscle cramping. Make sure you drink plenty of healthy fluids throughout the day, especially during exercise and strenuous work, to keep properly hydrated.

It’s normal to have some degree of muscle cramping once in a while, but if you experience foot cramps on a regular basis you should see your foot care professional to determine the cause. Persistent cramps may be a sign of more serious problems.

Some potentially serious causes of painful foot cramps include the following:

1)    Decreased blood circulation—Systemic diseases like diabetes and peripheral artery disease can contribute to decreased blood flow that can cause muscles in the legs and feet to contract and cramp.

2)    Mineral deficiencies—Potassium, calcium, and magnesium are the main minerals that are needed for proper muscle functioning to help avoid cramps and other muscular difficulties. If you are not getting enough minerals in your diet, a supplement can help.

3)    Nerve pinchingLumbar stenosis is a condition that can compress nerves in the spinal cord, leading to muscle cramps. You can relieve the pressure on the nerves by leaning slightly forward while standing, walking, and exercising.

If you need help treating painful foot cramps, see your foot doctor for an evaluation. Dr. Scott Nelson of Foot and Ankle Medical Clinic in Garland, TX (county of Dallas) is a board-certified and highly experienced podiatrist who has helped people suffering from all types of foot and ankle injuries and deformities. From bunions, to diabetic foot problems, sports injuries and fungal nails, you can trust that Dr. Nelson and his staff are wholeheartedly devoted to your foot health. Please contact our office with any questions you may have or to schedule an appointment by calling 972-414-9800.